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The Aromahead Blog - Aromatherapy Education and Resources

Licorice Lovers Diffuser Blend Recipe!

Licorice Lovers Diffuser Blend Recipe!

If you’re a fan of the candy-like, sweet, spicy scent of licorice, you’re going to love this diffuser blend!

It has a rich, anisic aroma, layered with herbal, peppery notes. 

In addition to smelling absolutely irresistible, the Licorice Lovers Diffuser Blend has emotional benefits.

If you tend to be shy, withdrawn, or nervous about speaking up, this is the blend for you! 

Use this licorice-like diffuser blend for more:

  • Self-assurance & self-trust
  • Clarity of thought
  • Courage to speak your mind

Let’s get to the recipe, then I’ll share more about these four essential oils.

Licorice Lovers Diffuser Blend

  • 4 drops Sweet Basil essential oil (Ocimum basilicum ct. linalool)
  • 2 drops Anise essential oil (Pimpinella anisum)
  • 2 drops Elemi essential oil (Canarium luzonicum)
  • 1 drop Fennel essential oil (Foeniculum vulgare)

About the essential oils in the Licorice Lovers Diffuser Blend

Sweet Basil essential oil

Ocimum basilicum ct. linalool

Sweet Basil oil smells fresh, sweet, and herbal, with that anisic note we want for this diffuser blend.

As its chemotype shows, it’s rich in the component linalool. In studies, linalool has been shown to calm the nervous system.

While Sweet Basil oil is emotionally soothing, it’s not overly relaxing. I love using this oil for people who are constantly multi-tasking, stretching themselves thin. Sweet Basil can focus and ease your mind. It’s perfect for the middle of a workday.

Anise essential oil

Pimpinella anisum

Anise essential oil has a strong licorice-like aroma! Just 2 drops are enough to bring that scent to our blend.

If you’ve ever felt exhausted but unable to settle down or rest, you’ll like Anise oil: it can calm your body and mind, while also helping you feel strong enough to face challenges.

That’s largely due to its main component, trans-anethole, which can relax the body’s systems. 

Trans-anethole has safety precautions to be aware of. 

In Essential Oil Safety, Second Edition, Tisserand and Young recommend avoiding anise essential oil if you’re pregnant, breast-feeding, or if you have endometriosis, estrogen-related cancer, or a bleeding disorder. 

Anise is also contraindicated if you’re on anticoagulant medications. It’s too strong for sensitive skin and for children under 5 years old. 

Elemi essential oil

Canarium luzonicum

Elemi essential oil doesn’t have an anisic scent.

But its dry, lemony, peppery aroma complements the scent of licorice beautifully!

We can thank the component d-limonene for Elemi’s lemon-like notes. D-limonene has also been proven to help shift sad and anxious feelings into more positive, upbeat ones. It brings emotional security.

Learn more about Elemi oil in this YouTube video!

Sweet Fennel essential oil

Foeniculum vulgare 

Sweet Fennel adds more licorice-scent to our diffuser blend, along with sweet and earthy notes. 

It enhances this diffuser blend’s ability to dispel shyness, strengthening your inner core of confidence.

Like Anise, Sweet Fennel contains trans-anethole. All of the safety concerns I mentioned for Anise apply to this oil as well.

If you’d rather avoid Anise and Sweet Fennel,
simply use more Sweet Basil and Elemi. 

Licorice Lovers Diffuser Blend

I hope you love the Licorice Lovers Diffuser Blend as much as I do!

Try diffusing it after dinner—the anisic essential oils can also help support digestion. 

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CITATIONS
Buchbauer, G., Jirovetz, L., Jager, W., Plank, C. and Dietrich, H. (1993) Fragrance compounds and essential oils with sedative effects upon inhalation. Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 82, 6, 660-664.

Linck, V.M., da Silva, A.L., Figueiró, M., Caramão, E.B., Moreno, P.R.H. and Elisabetsky, E. (2010) Effects of inhaled linalool in anxiety, social interaction and aggressive behaviour in mice. Phytomedicine 17, 679-683.

Albuquerque AA, Sorenson AL, Leal-Cardoso JH (1995) Effects of essential oil of Croton zehntneri, and of anethole and estragole on skeletal muscles. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 49 (1): 41-49. Cited by Bowles EJ  (2003) The Chemistry of Aromatherapeutic Oils 3rd Edition. Crows Nest: Allen and Unwin

Lima, N.G., de Souza, D.P., Pimenta, F.C., Alves, M.F., de Souza, F.S., (2012a) Anxiolytic-like activity and GC-MS analysis of (R)-(+)-limonene fragrance, a natural compound found in foods and plants. Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior 103, 450-454.

Karen serves as Co-Director of Education at Aromahead Institute, where she works closely with students and helps them earn aromatherapy certification. Karen’s strong values for healthcare, education, and sustainable practices have guided her entire career, and remain the principles that shape her daily activities at Aromahead. Karen loves sharing her knowledge of essential oils and how they can enhance the beauty of ones’ journey through life and has authored numerous articles and guides on the safe and effective therapeutic uses of essential oils. In Karen’s free time, she can be found hiking amongst nature, reading, and enjoying her family.

Topics: Diffuser Blends, sweet basil, how to use elemi essential oil, essential oils for calming, mental clarity, calm an overactive mind, how to use essential oils for digestion support, anise essential oil, fennel essential oil

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